Revision of Events from Tue, 04/26/2016 - 11:03

 The Stanford Peace+Justice Studies Initiative
and

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute
present

Ways to Justice
Perspectives on Nonviolence, Civil Resistance and Self Defense

May 6th - 8th, 2016
Stanford University

Free and open to the public

The purpose of the “Ways to Justice” conference is to bring together prominent scholars and activists who share an interest in the methods of struggle used in grassroots justice movements. A collection of historical anniversaries that are being marked in 2016, including the 50th anniversaries of the rise of the Black Power movement and founding of the Black Panthers, and of the release of the seminal film The Battle of Algiers, provide a frame for re-examining the challenges to nonviolent methods that arose in the 1960s and that reverberate in today's struggles for civil and human rights.

 

Current Schedule (watch here for updates):

Friday (May 6) - Tresidder Memorial Union, Oak Lounge West (2nd floor)

 

10:00am-noon    Roundtable 1: "Civil Versus Armed Resistance in a Global Context: Quantitative Studies and Historical Contingencies"

    George Ciccariello-Maher, Associate Professor of Politics Drexel University

    Sharon Erickson Nepstad, Professor and Chair of Sociology, University of New Mexico

    Maria Stephan, Senior Policy Fellow, United States Institute of Peace

    Rebecca Tarlau, Postdoctoral Scholar in the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University

    Joel Beinin (Chair), Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History, Stanford University

 

noon-12:30pm    Lunch Break

 

12:30-1:30pm    Film Screening and Filmmaker Discussion

    Love and Solidarity: Rev. James Lawson and Nonviolence in the Search for Workers' Rights (2014), featuring Michael K. Honey (Co-producer)

 

1:30-3:30pm    Roundtable 2: "Nonviolent Action Versus Diversity of Tactics in Contemporary Resistance Movements"

    Peter Gelderloos (participating remotely), anarchist and writer

    Juliet Hooker (participating remotely), Associate Professor of Government and of African and African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas at Austin

    Greisa Martinez, Advocacy Director, United We Dream Network

    Omar Wasow, Assistant Professor of Politics, Princeton University

    Todd Davies (Chair), Co-Director of the Peace+Justice Studies Initiative and Associate Director and Lecturer in Symbolic Systems, Stanford University

 

3:30-4:00pm    Break

 

4:00-6:00pm    Roundtable 3: "Cui Bono? Do Violent 'Flanks' Help or Hurt Nonviolent Movements? Does Nonviolence Help the State?"

    Herbert Haines, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, State University of New York, College at Cortland

    Dustin Ells Howes, David J. Kriskovich Distinguished Professor of Political Science, Louisiana State University

    Maria Stephan, Senior Policy Fellow, United States Institute of Peace

    Omar Wasow, Assistant Professor of Politics, Princeton University

    Jim Campbell (Chair), Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States History, Stanford University

 

6:-00-7:00pm    Dinner break + Open Space in Oak Lounge West (sign up on the day of the conference)

 

7:00-9:00pm    Performances: Poetry and Music Across Generations

    Stanford Spoken Word Collective (poetry)

    Michael K. Honey (freedom songs)

    Jae and EAGLEBABEL of The Outsiders (hip hop)

 

9:00-11:00pm    Film Screening

    The Battle of Algiers (1966)

 

 

Saturday (May 7) - Building 420 (Jordan Hall)

 

8:30-9:00am    Breakfast Served [Courtyard]

 

9:00-10:00am    Student Workshops Keynote [Room 040]

    Kristian Davis Bailey ('14), activist and social movement journalist based in Detroit

 

10:00-11:30am    Parallel Session 1

    Film Screening: Concerning Violence (2014) [Room 040]   

    Student Workshop A: "Strategic Logics of Anti-Capitalism", led by Courtney Pal ('18) [Room TBA]

    Student Workshop B: "Democratizing Our Movements: Techniques for Anti-Authoritarian Group Structure, Decision-making, and Facilitation", led by Dean Chahim ('18) [Room TBA]

    Student Workshop C: "Activist Tour of Stanford", led by the Stanford Asian American Activist Coalition (SAAAC) [Meeting Place TBA]

 

11:30am-12:00    Lunch Served [Courtyard]

 

12:00-12:30pm    Lunch Presentation by Activists from Freedom Side [Room 040]

    Austin Belali, Director of the Youth Engagement Fund of the Democracy Alliance

    Greisa Martinez, Advocacy Director, United We Dream Network

    Speaker TBA

 

12:30-2:30pm    Roundtable 4: "Meanings of 'Nonviolence': An Approach to Political Action or a Way of Life?" [Room 040]

    Michael K. Honey, Fred T. and Dorothy G. Haley Endowed Professor of the Humanities and Professor, Labor and Ethnic Studies and American History, University of Washington at Tacoma

    Vinod K. Kool, Professor of Psychology, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute   

    Michael Nagler, Professor Emeritus of Classics and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

    Jamila Raqib, Executive Director of the Albert Einstein Institution, and Research Affiliate of the Center for International Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Linda Hess (Chair), Co-Director of the Peace+Justice Studies Initiative and Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies, Stanford University

 

2:30-3:00pm    Break

 

3:00-5:00pm    Roundtable 5: "Historical Role(s) of Nonviolent Action and Self-Defense in Civil Rights Struggles" [Room 040]

    Charles Cobb (participating remotely), SNCC Digital Gateway Visiting Scholar, Duke University

    Mary Elizabeth King, Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, University for Peace; Scholar-in-Residence in the School of International Service, American University; and Distinguished Fellow at the Rothermere Institute, University of Oxford

    Danielle McGuire, Associate Professor of History, Wayne State University

    Maria Varela, community activist, writer, photographer, and teacher based in Albuquerque

    Clayborne Carson (Chair), Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute and Martin Luther King, Jr. Centennial Professor of History, Stanford University

 

5:00-6:30pm    Parallel Session 2

    Film Screening and Filmmaker Discussion: Have You Heard from Johannesburg? (2010), featuring Connie Field (Director) [Room 040]

    Student Workshop D: "Healing Ourselves First: Facilitation towards Social Justice", led by Jazlyn Patricio-Archer ('16) [Room TBA]

    Student Workshop E: "South Asian Activism in the Bay Area", led by Manisha Rattu ('19) [Room TBA]

    Student Workshop F: "Campaign Communications Strategy and Execution", led by Sophie Harrison ('16) [Room TBA]

 

5:30-7:00pm    Book Signing Event for Authors [Room 050]

 

7:00-9:00pm    Dinner Break + Open Spaces in Reserved Rooms (sign up on the day of the conference)

 

9:00-11:00pm    Film Screening [Room 040]

    Freedom Song (2000)

 

 

Sunday (May 8) - Building 420 (Jordan Hall)

 

9:30-10:00am    Breakfast Served [Courtyard]

10:00-11:30am    Concluding Roundtable: "What Have We Learned?" [Room 040]

 

11:30am-noon    Lunch Served [Courtyard]

 

12:00-2:00pm    Lunch Panel: "Spiritual Outrage and Redemptive Activism" [Room 040]

    Rev. Byron Bland, Senior Consultant for the Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation (SCICN) and Lecturer in Law, Stanford Law School; Chaplain/Ombudsperson, Palo Alto University

    Bishop Ernie Jackson, Pastor at Grace Tabernacle Community Church, San Francisco

    Rev. J. Alfred Smith Jr., Pastor of Allen Temple Baptist Church, Oakland

    Gaynor Siataga, community activist, San Francisco

    Floyd Thompkins, Director of the Center for Innovation in Ministry, San Francisco Theological Seminary

 

(2:00-4:00pm    Continuation sessions - Rooms available for follow-on discussions)

About the participants:

  • Kristian Davis Bailey: co-author (with Khury Petersen-Smith) of the 2015 Black Solidarity Statement with Palestine; graduate of Stanford University in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (B.A., 2014); activist and social movement journalist based in Detroit
  • Austin Belali: organizer and educator; led the development of a major youth program at one of America’s largest service sector unions and has taught comparative democracy to high school students in Dakar, Senegal and Delhi, India; was a key organizer of the youth of color network Freedom Side; board member of low-income immigrant organization CASA; Director of the Youth Engagement Fund of the Democracy Alliance in Washington, D.C.
  • Joel Beinin: author Workers and Thieves: Labor Movements and Popular Uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt (2015) and co-editor with Frédéric Vairel of Social Movements, Mobilization, and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa, 2nd edition (2013) among other books; former President of the Middle East Studies Association of North America (2002) and Director of Middle East Studies and Professor of History at the American University in Cairo (2006-2008); Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History at Stanford University
  • Rev. Byron Bland: served as associate director of SCICN and research associate at the Center for Democracy Development and the Rule of Law for 12 years (until 2009); former campus minister for Untied Campus Christian Ministries at Stanford; Senior Consultant for the Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation (SCICN), Lecturer in Law at the Stanford Law School, and Chaplain/Ombudsperson for Palo Alto University
  • James T. Campbell: co-editor of Race, Nation, and Empire in American History (2007) and author of Middle Passages: African American Journeys to Africa, 1787-2005 (2006) and of Songs of Zion: The African Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States and South Africa (1998); co-creator of the Freedom Now! website; Edgar E. Robinson Professor in United States History at Stanford University
  • Clayborne Carson: author of Martin's Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. (2013), In Struggle: SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960s (1981), Malcolm X: The FBI File (1991), and editor (chosen by Coretta Scott King) of The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. (7 volumes, ongoing) and of the Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. (whose audio version received a Grammy Award); Senior Adviisor for the series Eyes on the Prize (1986, 1990); Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute and Martin Luther King, Jr. Centennial Professor of History at Stanford University
  • George Ciccariello-Maher: author of We Created Chávez: A People's History of the Venezuelan Revolution (2013) and two forthcoming books; has taught radical theory and politics at Drexel, U.C. Berkeley, San Quentin State Prison, and the Venezuelan School of Planning in Caracas; Associate Professor of Politics at Drexel University
  • Charles Cobb: staff member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s; author of This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible (2014) and other books; founding member of the National Association of Black Journalists and inducted into their Hall of Fame in 2008; SNCC Digital Gateway Visiting Scholar at Duke University [participating through a live video link]
  • Todd Davies: co-editor with Seeta Peña Gangadharan of Online Deliberation: Design, Research, and Practice (2009); co-Director of the Peace+Justice Studies Initiative and Associate Director and Lecturer in Symbolic Systems at Stanford University
  • Connie Field: director of documentary films, including Forever Activists: Stories from the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade (1990), Freedom on My Mind (1994), Have You Heard From Johannesburg? (2010) and Al Helm: Martin Luther King in Palestine (2013); winner of an Emmy Award and Sundance Grand Jury Prize, and a two-time Academy Award nominee
  • Peter Gelderloos: author of The Failure of Nonviolence (Revised) (2015) and How Nonviolence Protects the State (2007), among other books and articles; anarchist and writer [participating through a live video link]
  • Herbert Haines: social movement scholar who coined the term "radical flank effect" to refer to the effects that more radical activists have on broader movements of which they are part; author of Black Radicals and the Civil Rights Mainstream, 1954-1970 (1984), which argued that radical flanks are beneficial to movements and strengthen those within movements who are viewed as moderates; Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the State University of New York, College at Cortland
  • Linda Hess: author of Bodies of Song: Kabir Oral Traditions and Performative Worlds in North India (2015); co-Director of the Peace+Justice Studies Initiative and Senior Lecturer in Religious Studies at Stanford University
  • Michael K. Honey: author of Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign (2008) and other books; co-producer of the documentary film Love and Solidarity: Rev. James Lawson and Nonviolence in the Search for Workers’ Rights (2014); 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Fellow in the Humanities; Fred T. and Dorothy G. Haley Endowed Professor of the Humanities and Professor, Labor and Ethnic Studies and American History at the University of Washington at Tacoma
  • Juliet Hooker: political theorist specializing in comparative political theory and critical race theory; author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity (2009); co-Chair of the American Political Science Association’s Presidential Task Force on Racial and Social Class Inequalities in the Americas; Associate Professor of Government and of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin [participating through a live video link]
  • Dustin Ells Howes: author of Freedom Without Violence (2016) and Toward a Credible Pacifism (2009); contributor to the website Waging Nonviolence; recipient of the University of North Carolina Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 2002; David J. Kriskovich Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Louisiana State University
  • Bishop Ernest Jackson: an ordained bishop and a doctoral candidate at San Francisco Theological Seminar; past president of the Telecommunication Commission for the city and county San Francisco; Pastor at the Grace Tabernacle Community Church (with a cornerstone ministry in social justice) in Bayview Hunters Point
  • Mary Elizabeth King: SNCC staffer from the 1960s, author of Gandhian Nonviolent Struggle and Untouchability in South India: The 1924-25 Vykom Satyagraha and Mechanisms of Change (2014) and many other books on nonviolent conflict;  Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at the UN-affiliated University for Peace, Scholar-in-Residence in the School of International Service at American University, and Distinguished Fellow at the Rothermere Institute, University of Oxford
  • Vinod K. Kool: author of The Psychology of Nonviolence and Aggression (2008) and other books and articles; previous teaching positions at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Oregon; recent recipient of his third Fullbright Award, including two as a Fullbright Specialist, to deliver a series of lectures at Mahatma Gandhi University in India; Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly)
  • Greisa Martinez: activist with Freedom Side; co-founded the Council for Minority Student Affairs at Texas A&M University, the first undocumented youth-led group in the University’s 100 year history; founded the Texas Dream Alliance and was a fellow with the League of Young Voters; Advocacy Director at the United We Dream Network
  • Danielle McGuire: author of At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance—a New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power (2011) and a forthcoming book about the 1967 Detroit racial uprising; co-editor (with John Dittmer) of Freedom Rights: New Perspectives of the Civil Rights Movement (2011); Associate Professor of History at Wayne State University
  • Michael Nagler: co-founder of the Peace and Conflict Studies Program at the University of California, Berkeley, author of The Search for a Nonviolent Future (2002) and other books; Founder-President of Metta Center for Nonviolence; recipient of the Jamnalal Bajaj International Award for “Promoting Gandhian Values Outside India” in 2007, joining  Archbishop Desmond Tutu and peace scholar Johan Galtung, among other contributors to nonviolence, as recipients of the award; Professor Emeritus of Classics and Comparative Literature at UC Berkeley
  • Sharon Erickson Nepstad: author of Nonviolent Struggle: Theories, Strategies and Dynamics (2015), Nonviolent Revolutions: Civil Resistance in the Late Twentieth Century (2011), Religion and War Resistance in the Plowshares Movement (2008), and Convictions of the Soul: Religion, Culture, and Agency in the Central America Solidarity Movement (2004); Professor and Chair of Sociology at the University of New Mexico
  • Jamila Raqib: co-author with Gene Sharp of Self-Liberation: A Guide to Strategic Planning for Action to End a Dictatorship or Other Oppression; Executive Director of the Albert Einstein Institution and as a Research Affiliate of the Center for International Studies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • Rev. J. Alfred Smith, Jr.: holder of a Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) degree from San Francisco Theological Seminary, San Anselmo, CA; served for nearly six years as the Senior Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church of San Jose CA, a congregation organized in 1893, which serves as the first and only official African American historical landmark in the city; Pastor of Allen Temple Baptist, Oakland, California
  • Maria Stephan: co-author with Erica Chenoweth of Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict (2011); editor of Is Authoritarianism Staging a Comeback? (2015) and Civilian Jihad (2009); recipient of the 2012 Woodrow Wilson Foundation Prize by the American Political Science Association for the best book published in political science and the 2012 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order; formerly with the U.S. State Department; Senior Policy Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace
  • Gaynor Siataga: former gang member who was stabbed 15 times, shot once and saw dozens of friends lose their lives; today works with the Mayor’s Office on Street Violence Intervention Program,and is an activist for fair housing and a community advocate against intentional use of physical or perceived force in the Bayview Hunters Point district of San Francisco
  • Rebecca Tarlau: a 2014 Ph.D. in Social and Cultural Studies in Education from the University of California, Berkeley; author of "Not-So-Public Contention: Movement Strategies, Regimes, and the Transformation of Public Institutions in Brazil" in the journal Mobilization, and "From a Language to a Theory of Resistance: Critical Pedagogy, the Limits of ‘Framing,’ and Social Change" (in Educational Theory); Postdoctoral Scholar in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University
  • Rev. Floyd Thompkins: a former Assistant Dean of Religious Life at Princeton University, Associate Dean of Religious Life of Stanford University and pastor of Antioch Baptist Church in San Jose, Georgia; former CEO of the Bower Fund, a grassroots non profit organization that developed programs to empower the families of opportunity youth in South Georgia; formerly the Strong African American Family Educator for the University of Georgia Family Research Center; Director of the Center for Innovation in Ministry at the San Francisco Theological Seminary
  • Maria Varela: staff member with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s, and co-founder of Ganados del Valle and a principal of the Rural Resources Group in northern New Mexico; author of "Time to Get Ready" from the book Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts By Women in SNCC (2010); a MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 1990, visiting faculty member at the Colorado College (1997-2012), and one of the "1000 Women Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize" in 2005; community activist, writer, photographer, and teacher based in Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Omar Wasow: a 2013 Ph.D. in African and African American Studies from Harvard University; founder of BlackPlanet.com and the Brooklyn Excelsior Charter School; author of “Nonviolence, Violence and Voting: Effects of the 1960s Black Protests on White Attitudes and Voting Behavior” and another recent working paper about responses to nonviolent and violent protest in Ferguson, Missouri; Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics at Princeton University

PAST EVENTS:

Date(s) Event Media
May 21, 2015 Student-Organized Event: "ISIS and the Politics of Intervention"  
May 18, 2015 Student-Organized Event: "The Formerly Incarcerated People's Movement: Challenging the Dominant Narrative While Attempting to Shift the Current Paradigm"  
May 11, 2015 Student-Organized Event: "Torture and the Police State"  
May 4, 2015 Lectures: Two Special Events With Professor Noura Erakat, George Mason University video (2nd lecture)
April 7, 2015 Alumni Panel: "Social Justice Careers"  
February 19, 2015 Talk: "Academic Freedom in the Context of the Israel-Palestine Conflict: A Talk by Steven Salaita"  
February 11, 2015 Dialogue: "Understanding Nonviolent Power: Confronting Repression and Sustaining Resistance"  
January 23-24, 2015 Staged Reading: "Words to End All Wars" review
October 15, 2014 Town Hall Forum: "Why More War? The U.S., the 'Islamic State,' and Popular Support for Military Intervention" audio
September 30, 2014 Town Hall Forum: "A Forum on Gaza: What Should We Know?"  
May 30-31, 2014 Conference: "Nonviolent Action Amidst Violent Conflict"  
April 1-9, 2014 Film Screenings with Discussion: "Reimagining Violence: Peace+Justice Studies at Stanford" screened-video
February 20, 2014 Launch Event: "Peace+Justice Studies at Stanford: An Introductory Meeting"  
February 11, 2014 Film Screening with Discussion: "Making the Change, Being the Change: Theatre as Outer and Inner Process" screened-video
January 16, 2014 Debate: "Guns in America: A Year After Sandy Hook" video